On the Horizon: Emerging Trends in North Carolina’s Seafood Industry

“I go to sleep at night wondering whether I’ll be able to go to work tomorrow,” said Buxton gillnetter Dale Farrow. “I started fishing when I was twelve, bumping around in the creek here, and I’m not trained to do anything else.”  Farrow jostled his boat, Miss Geraldine, into the queue of fishing boats waiting to unload at Jeffrey’s Seafood in Hatteras. The atmosphere on the fishing docks was electric after a good day of fishing for the fleet. Men shouted out to each other over the  noise of  gurgling diesel engines, clambering conveyor belts, and a rhythmic clink as workers shoveled ice into fish boxes; a noisy backdrop to the daily theater that plays out in fish houses all along North Carolina’s coast.

The bustling scene masked the worry that comes during the quiet nighttime hours. Commercial fishermen, contrary to their guarded, tough demeanor, are optimists at heart, rolling with the mean seas, stiff winds, and running tides that can be part and parcel of another day on the water. But that resiliency is put to the test when matched up against man-made forces that are quickly rearranging the watermen’s world. Hit with layers of increasingly stringent regulations, low fish and shellfish prices, and high fuel costs, fishermen face an uncertain future and many count themselves as an endangered species.

by Susan West and Barbara J. Garrity-Blake, From the North Carolina Folklore Journal, 59.1 Spring-Summer 2012

Visit the North Carolina Folklore Journal site to read the full article

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NC Fisheries Reform Act: An Oral History

In 1994, the NC General Assembly implemented a moratorium on the sale of new commercial fishing licenses and established the NC Fisheries Moratorium Steering Committee to study the coastal fisheries management process and to recommend changes to improve the system. The NC Fisheries Reform Act, signed by Governor James B. Hunt on August 14, 1997, was based on the final report of the Moratorium Steering Committee.

The year 2017 marks the twentieth anniversary of the 1997 NC Fisheries Reform Act, far-reaching legislation that changed how fisheries are managed in North Carolina. Developed over the course of more than three years during a period of heightened concern over the future of the state’s marine resources, the Fisheries Reform Act set the framework for mandated fisheries management and coastal habitat protection plans, restructuring of commercial fishing licenses, and eventual development of a recreational fishing license.

Oral history interviews are capturing the accounts of key individuals who have played instrumental roles in the implementation of the Fisheries Reform Act (FRA) or in its initial conception and development. The interviews will provide a record of the successes and shortcomings of the FRA in addressing the environmental, social, and economic challenges of the past two decades and the prospective value of the FRA in addressing emerging issues.

In the initial phase of the project, audio excerpts from interviews will be featured on the Coastal Voices website, the Coastal Voices YouTube channel, and the project Facebook page. The complete interview recordings and transcripts will be available later in 2016. Podcasts featuring interview excerpts will be created in 2017. All of these materials will be available online at no-charge for use by individuals and organizations.

The project is funded by the North Carolina Sea Grant Community Collaborative Research Grant Program.

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The 1997 Fisheries Reform Act: An Oral History Perspective

In 1994, the NC General Assembly implemented a moratorium on the sale of new commercial fishing licenses and established the NC Fisheries Moratorium Steering Committee to study the coastal fisheries management process and to recommend changes to improve the system. The NC Fisheries Reform Act, signed by Governor James B. Hunt on August 14, 1997, was based on the final report of the Moratorium Steering Committee.

The year 2017 marks the twentieth anniversary of the 1997 NC Fisheries Reform Act, far-reaching legislation that changed how fisheries are managed in North Carolina. Developed over the course of more than three years during a period of heightened concern over the future of the state’s marine resources, the Fisheries Reform Act set the framework for mandated fisheries management and coastal habitat protection plans, restructuring of commercial fishing licenses, and development of a recreational fishing license.

Oral history interviews are capturing the accounts of key individuals who have played instrumental roles in the implementation of the Fisheries Reform Act (FRA) or in its initial conception and development. The interviews will provide a record of the successes and shortcomings of the FRA in addressing the environmental, social, and economic challenges of the past two decades and the prospective value of the FRA in addressing emerging issues.

In the initial phase of the project, audio excerpts from interviews will be featured on the Coastal Voices website (https://carolinacoastalvoices.wordpress.com/category/fisheries-reform-act/). The complete interview recordings and transcripts will be available later this year. Podcasts featuring interview excerpts will be created early next year. All of these materials will be available online at no-charge for use by individuals and organizations.

The project is funded by the North Carolina Sea Grant Community Collaborative Research Grant Program.

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The 1997 Fisheries Reform Act: An Oral History Perspective

The 1997 Fisheries Reform Act: An Oral History Perspective project will get underway this spring. The project is funded by the North Carolina Sea Grant Community Collaborative Research Grant Program.

The landmark 1997 N.C. Fisheries Reform Act changed how fisheries are managed in the state. To mark the 20th anniversary of the law, this project will collect perspectives on the development of the law that would set the framework for mandated fisheries management and coastal habitat protection plans, restructuring of commercial fishing licenses, and development of a recreational fishing license. The team also will gather perspectives on the implementation and impacts of the act. The partners will conduct about a dozen in-depth interviews with representatives of agencies and organizations involved in the fisheries and habitat topics. Their results, including transcriptions, will be shared not only via the participating partners program but also through a NOAA oral history program and the Coastal Voices website and YouTube channel.

Team members are Susan West of Buxton, with Jimmy Johnson of the Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership, Sandra Davidson of Bit & Grain, Mary Williford of the Southern Historical Collection at UNC-CH, Barbara J. Garrity-Blake of Duke University Marine Lab, and Karen Amspacher of the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center.

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Coastal Voices Oral History Workshop on April 3, 2016

A Coastal Voices Oral History workshop and refresher course will be held Sunday, April 3,  from 2-5 pm, at the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center on Harkers Island, NC.

We have a specific project we’d like you to help us with should you be interested. In Harm’s Way is a collaborative project with Long Island Traditions that looks at how coastal people deal with storms. This project will use oral history interviews to give a sense of the resiliency and resourcefulness of coastal communities located in the path of hurricanes.

We welcome new participants to the April workshop, as well as “repeat customers” wanting to refresh their skills. Please contact Barbara at 252-342-8028 for more information or to register. All are welcomed to join our team of community oral historians!

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Our Streets, Our Stories

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P.S. 44 sits at the corner of Throop Avenue and Monroe Street in Bedford-Stuyvesant, treat Brooklyn. It’s a square, medical brick building, cialis sale bordered to the north by a playground and to the east and west by rowhouses—a hodgepodge of the neighborhood’s varied architectural imprints. But around the turn of the century, long before the school existed, it was the site of a horse stable.

This fact is not recorded in a textbook. It belongs, instead, to a collective memory that’s growing dimmer as the neighborhood around it transforms.

Our Streets, Our Stories, a project run through the Brooklyn Public Library’s Department of Outreach Services, gives those memories a way to persist into the future. It began in 2014 at three library branches

Read more here.

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